The varying costs of dentures and other considerations

Perhaps you recently had a dental appointment to address concerns with your teeth. Your dentist then recommended dentures as one treatment option. Now, you are in fact-finding mode to compare the varying costs associated with dentures.

If this is the case, we can recommend a dentist near you. But before we do that, allow us to share with you what we know about denture costs. In the next section, we’ll give you the typical price ranges for dentures. We’ll also share other important things to think about before choosing this treatment method.Truth about dentures, tooth replacement, bridge, dental implants

It is important to note that the term “dentures” is sometimes used to reference two different procedures. The first, being a traditional “removable denture.” Removable dentures are made to sit on top of an individual’s gums and frequently require denture adhesive to keep stable.

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Conversely, implant dentures are stabilized by dental implants and do not require denture adhesive. The following pricing information is meant to offer details on the cost of removable dentures, not implant dentures. We recently shared a blog post on full mouth dental implants. If you’re interested in learning more about stabilizing a denture with dental implants and what it usually costs, you should find that information to be helpful.

Price variance of lower-level to high-quality dentures

 

Not all dentures are priced the same. In fact, the quality of some dentures is better than others. Much of this has to do with the characteristics of the materials chosen by you and your dentist. As with many other considerations, varying costs of dentures may influence your decision. Therefore, it’s important to know what is represented by different denture fees.

For starters, let’s look at the cost spectrum that dentures generally fall within:

One or Two

Dentures

Low-Cost

Dentures

Mid-Level

Dentures

High-Quality 

Dentures

One Denture

(upper or lower)

$500

$800 - $1,200

$1,500 - $3,000

Two Dentures (set)

$1,000

$1,600 - $2,400

$3,000 - $6,000

 

As outlined in this grid, you may be able to find a dentist who can perform a single denture for as low as $500. At this no-frills level, a set of dentures for your upper and lower jaw, will cost about $1,000 and would be your most affordable denture option.

The next level for a single denture usually falls between the price range of $800 and $1,200. This is generally considered more of a mid-level denture. Of course, if upper and lower dentures are both required, your fees will usually be closer to $1,600 to $2,400.

The most expensive denture will often fall within the range of $1,500 to $3,000. If a set is required, $3,000 to $6,000 for upper and lower dentures is within reason.

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Consider the cost of teeth extractions with the denture procedure

 

When it comes to the total overall cost of a denture procedure, you’ll also need to consider whether extractions are necessary. Extractions are usually not included in the price of a denture. It is not uncommon for a single-tooth extraction to be approximately $250 to $270.

If your remaining teeth will require a more involved “surgical extraction,” the extraction fee is usually somewhat higher. Therefore, if four teeth have to be extracted, this could add at least another $1,000 to the cost of receiving a denture.

A few other considerations should be made before you choose dentures as your choice of treatment. We’ll share a few of them here for your convenience. We’ll also offer you a couple of great resources so you can find a dentist near you.

Choosing a denture based on price is not always a wise decision

 

While you can often find a single denture priced as low as $500, consider a few important factors. Usually, dentures in the lower price range are fabricated with acrylic material that looks less natural.cost of dental implants, credit cards, interest-free, finaning

In essence, it’s usually easier for someone to recognize that “those are not your real teeth!” Your friends, family and colleagues are more likely to recognize you are wearing dentures.

Even those who don’t know you as well often notice when teeth don’t look natural. And typically, if a denture doesn’t look natural, chances are it won’t feel natural either. Again, this is more of an issue with a low-cost denture.

If you’ve never eaten with a denture that feels unnatural, it’s not something you want to experience. Eating coarse foods like raw carrots or salad or biting into a sandwich can cause sore gums or pain if the denture doesn’t fit well. This will compromise your ability to chew your food well.

It is better to opt for a quality denture or even dental implants and consider cost-effective ways to make your treatment affordable by paying for it over time.

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Mid-level vs. high-level dentures

 

If possible, always opt for a mid-level denture, at least. Yes, it is more expensive. But generally, individuals are happier with their smiles and feel more comfortable once they become used to a mid-level denture.

Opting for a high-quality denture, frequently referred to as a premium denture, will offer even more benefits over a mid-level denture. With a premium denture, not only are the best materials and most effective processing methods applied, but more options are available for your dentist to make the denture look more natural, too.

For instance, maybe your natural teeth were not perfectly aligned before they needed to be removed. And for this reason, you prefer that your denture teeth are not made to look perfect either. With premium dentures, your dentist is able to add more character to your denture teeth, both in color and shape.

To many denture wearers, it matters when the pink areas of your denture can be colored more consistently with the natural color of your gums. It may also be important to you that your dentist is not limited by the varying shades of white that your denture teeth can be designed to satisfy.

Equally important, premium dentures tend to feel the most natural since the materials are the most comfortable to wear. While dentures can be challenging to get used to and eat with, the premium denture usually makes this less of an issue when compared to the low-cost and mid-level denture options.

Other consideration before deciding on a denture vs. implants

 

Below are a few helpful hints to remember when considering dentures as a treatment option. For more denture considerations, visit our Truth About Dentures section. The Truth About Dentures page may be one of the more informative pages you can visit before deciding to receive dentures.

Perhaps the most important fact to understand about removable dentures has to do with this: By design, dentures are not anchored to your jawbone like your natural teeth were. This is regardless of the quality of the denture. Why is this an issue?

When a set of denture teeth is not anchored down to your jawbone like natural teeth, a denture can move while chewing food. And yes, as mentioned before, the better the quality of material and fit, the more stable a denture can be when chewing food.

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Denture adhesive – often referred to as denture glue – may be used to reduce movement, but without true jawbone anchorage, you cannot fully keep your denture from moving.

Bone loss

 

There is yet another problem caused by having no jawbone anchorage from a denture. It’s called bone loss. Like most other areas of the human skeletal system, when bone is not stimulated, it begins to atrophy, or shrink.

Jawbone loss after tooth loss

Long-term use of denture can contribute to jawbone loss

We stimulate the bones in our legs by walking or running and in our arms by lifting things and pushing doors open. The bone in our jaws must be stimulated as well to remain strong and healthy.

This occurs when either natural teeth or dental implants are anchored into the bone. Unfortunately, since a removable denture sits on top of the gums, a denture doesn’t stimulate the jawbone.

Therefore, wearing a denture over time will do nothing to prevent your jawbone from shrinking and changing its shape. As the shape of your jawbone bone shrinks, your denture will become much looser.

And since your denture wasn’t designed to fit the changing structure of your jaw, over an extended period of time, it may become intolerable to wear. Many dentists recommend replacing removable dentures every five years. Dental implant supported teeth usually last much longer, making implants a better long-term investment.

Locating a dental implant dentist near you

 

If you believe a denture is the best treatment choice for you at this time, you will benefit most to see a dentist who is particularly skilled in dentures. Many dentists across the U.S. are qualified to offer you an effective denture treatment plan.

Image of TeethXpress, sometimes call full-mouth dental implants

Upper jaw TeethXpress, also known as full-mouth dental implants

If you would like to consider dental implants for the benefits they offer, visit our Before & After page to review several patient stories. See for yourself what other people are saying about the TeethXpress full mouth dental implant procedure and how it has changed their lives for the better.

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If figuring out a way to make dental implants affordable is your concern, you are not unique in this regard. Many patients seek affordable options. Visit our Cost of Dental Implants page for several dental implant payment plan options. You are likely to find a solution that will make receiving dental implants affordable and within your financial reach.

Contact a certified TeethXpress dentist near you to set up a dental implant consultation. You’ll find TeethXpress providers to be very knowledgeable and experienced in dental implant procedures.

We hope you have found this information to be helpful. Best of luck with satisfying your dental treatment needs.